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Hi from Poland. I have the same problem. First driveshaft has broken, when the ski was 32 mth. After replaced a parts it is broken again (48mth). I don't want this spark back again and my plan is to fight for my right and get full refund.




Goodluck, BRP will basically tell you to get lost. I had my ski in for the same issue 4 times this season and still needs to go back, but it's now out of warranty. BRP told me at first they were going to either offer me some extra warranty or compensation because the ski has had so many issues, then they said no to any of that..... My friends ski has had this driveshaft fail right out of warranty, and the dealer tried to go to bat with BRP to help him out and they wouldn't, he also tried speaking with them on the phone. I understand it's out of warranty, but it was only just out, you would think they would try to work something out to retain a customer..... Neither of us will ever purchase a BRP product again, the Spark was my first, while I enjoy the ski, I hate how BRP runs the customer service side of things...
 

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Hi everybody, just about to buy a 2015 900HO iBR, is this serious issue just for the
2014 model ? Models with or without iBR ?
Thanks for any input !
 

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IBR shouldn't matter. But as of yet there have been no reports of 2015's. If it is indeed an assembly issue it should have been caught after the 2014's. Even then it is only a handful of people that are experiencing. From what it seems all of the repeat repairs is due to improper repair. Replacing the shaft only and not replacing the crank at the same time.
 

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My dealer said, that they put also a brand new crankshaft (I saw the old parts) and it is broken again.

@Sburke, I am not happy to see how BRP's customer support works, but I will talk with my dealer, because in our law he takes a responsibility for a faulty product.

However, I don't know why BRP don't want to take a a responsibility for their mistake - it is not fair. I am sure that a lot of spark's users will have tha same problem in a future, because it is a design flaw. They should not to make a driveshaft directly connected with crankshaft.
 

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IBR shouldn't matter. But as of yet there have been no reports of 2015's. If it is indeed an assembly issue it should have been caught after the 2014's. Even then it is only a handful of people that are experiencing. From what it seems all of the repeat repairs is due to improper repair. Replacing the shaft only and not replacing the crank at the same time.
Thanks for your reply...I just pulled the trigger and yes I'm stoked:D
 

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However, I don't know why BRP don't want to take a a responsibility for their mistake - it is not fair. I am sure that a lot of spark's users will have tha same problem in a future, because it is a design flaw. They should not to make a driveshaft directly connected with crankshaft.

This is nothing new. Driveshafts have been directly connected to the crank for years and not just on BRP



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Goodluck, BRP will basically tell you to get lost. I had my ski in for the same issue 4 times this season and still needs to go back, but it's now out of warranty. BRP told me at first they were going to either offer me some extra warranty or compensation because the ski has had so many issues, then they said no to any of that..... My friends ski has had this driveshaft fail right out of warranty, and the dealer tried to go to bat with BRP to help him out and they wouldn't, he also tried speaking with them on the phone. I understand it's out of warranty, but it was only just out, you would think they would try to work something out to retain a customer..... Neither of us will ever purchase a BRP product again, the Spark was my first, while I enjoy the ski, I hate how BRP runs the customer service side of things...
At last a picture but where exactly is the break in the picture or are the splines just worn? Its to grainy to see anything.
 

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its real odd


the shaft has machined end that will go into the end of the crank with tight tolerance so should locate centre with little movement.


I say for the splines to were like that the hole in the crank must be worn out causing the shaft to bounce around wearing the splines out.


That would be no cheap fix new crank ?


You would have to measure the hole see if it still round and see.


If it is flogged out and out of warranty I would find a good machine shop
and take the engine out whole then get them the to bore a bigger hole and sleave it eg make a bush and the press it in to fit the crank shaft. To fit the original shaft diameter.
It could be done with out taking the engine apart on a milling machine a boring tool.
maybe your best option
 

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I would maybe even think about welding it as a cheap option. Sure it would be hard to separate in the future. But if the alternative is replacing the shaft and the crank what are you out?


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On a rethink boring and pressing a bush wont work in this case because you can't bore out enough to press and passed the splines that would be thick enough to work Bugger.


The only option is to bore the crank little as possible not passed the splines diameter then either weld the shaft end then machine to fit.










its real odd


the shaft has machined end that will go into the end of the crank with tight tolerance so should locate centre with little movement.


I say for the splines to were like that the hole in the crank must be worn out causing the shaft to bounce around wearing the splines out.


That would be no cheap fix new crank ?


You would have to measure the hole see if it still round and see.


If it is flogged out and out of warranty I would find a good machine shop
and take the engine out whole then get them the to bore a bigger hole and sleave it eg make a bush and the press it in to fit the crank shaft. To fit the original shaft diameter.
It could be done with out taking the engine apart on a milling machine a boring tool.
maybe your best option
 

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I would maybe even think about welding it as a cheap option. Sure it would be hard to separate in the future. But if the alternative is replacing the shaft and the crank what are you out?


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I suspect if you weld the shaft it will eventually break, the splines allow it to have some movement so the shaft can flex, crank and shaft are already needing replacement but if it did break you may cause other damage.
 

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If it worn splines perhaps a mettalic polymer would be of use. Something like Belzona® 1121 (Super XL-Metal) It wouldnt hurt to try . I actually have an aplication for a splined atv axle drive sprocket that would be a perfect test candidate.
 

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I suspect if you weld the shaft it will eventually break, the splines allow it to have some movement so the shaft can flex, crank and shaft are already needing replacement but if it did break you may cause other damage.

The splines are there not for movement, but for removal. I decent welder should make that one piece no problem. Like I said if the weld breaks worse case is you still need a crank and driveshaft. I've done it with axle shafts on pickups and they are lasting, I imagine there is a lot more torque there than on a sea-doo.


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The splines are there not for movement, but for removal. I decent welder should make that one piece no problem. Like I said if the weld breaks worse case is you still need a crank and driveshaft. I've done it with axle shafts on pickups and they are lasting, I imagine there is a lot more torque there than on a sea-doo.


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the engine flexes on its rubber mounts and the shaft moves on the splines as the engine moves, if the splines were there only for removal then they would be a straight cut spline and not a ball end to allow for movement, I don't doubt that you could weld it and I don't dispute that the crank and shaft are junk anyways but its not about torque its about movement, if the shaft breaks there would be a possibility that you could cause more damage.
 

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I can assure you the spline don't move. I have had mine apart multiple times and they are in their solid. A good shaft has no play what so ever. My shafts have straight cut splines. I don't see this ball end? My older one even had a little rust on the splines and was hard to remove. If there had been movement there it should have just slid out. I can't see how the weld breaking would cause more damage but i guess anything is possible. If the weld would break I could just see the shaft continuing to spin inside its socket and your back in the same boat.


In fact. Looking at the service manual. The engine side has two lip seals on the shaft, plus the shaft has a pilot shaft after the splines to prevent movement.

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In either case. I don't want to argue it. Being a welder I think welding the two pieces would be a viable option. The only tricky part would removing the pto housing with the shaft on to be able to weld it. But looking at the shaft and the pto housing I bet it can be done. If you can't get the pto housing back far enough to weld it, then welding it wouldn't be an option.


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I can assure you the spline don't move. I have had mine apart multiple times and they are in their solid. A good shaft has no play what so ever. My shafts have straight cut splines. I don't see this ball end? My older one even had a little rust on the splines and was hard to remove. If there had been movement there it should have just slid out. I can't see how the weld breaking would cause more damage but i guess anything is possible. If the weld would break I could just see the shaft continuing to spin inside its socket and your back in the same boat.


In fact. Looking at the service manual. The engine side has two lip seals on the shaft, plus the shaft has a pilot shaft after the splines to prevent movement.

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I am not talking about play in the splines, take the end of your shaft with it in the pto end and lift the end of the shaft up and down, it will move at least an inch up and down measured on the end of the shaft where it goes into the impeller, for some reason I can't upload the pic and video I took of the end of the shaft, I will try again tonight when I have more time, what I used to describe the end of the shaft wasn't a very good description, if you take a straight edge off the end of the shaft you will see the shaft isn't straight where the splines are cut but more of a ball shape, both ends of the shaft are like that but more pronounced on the front of the shaft. the shaft is made like that to allow minimal movement from the engine, the engine mounted on rubber mounts is going to move somewhat when landing off of waves etc.

if a weld was done properly it isn't likely to break at that spot again but somewhere else, but repetitive flexing in the shaft because it can't move would eventually fail one way or another I would think. but then again I am not an engineer, but I always figured there is a reason why things are made the way they are...

there are no seals that seal up to the shaft itself, the only thing attached on the shaft is the boot that seals the shaft to the pto end of the crank, the seals on the pto end seal on the crankshaft not on the driveshaft, you can pull the driveshaft out and start the engine and not loose any oil. and the pilot shaft does not prevent movement of the shaft, my video will show that as well.
 

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My shaft barely has a half an inch of movement and it's only from slop in the splines but I checked it when it was brand new. My wife's is a 2014 and I noticed it had more, I just assumed it was wear. My shaft at the engine is straight as an arrow. The splines by the impeller have a bit of a ball. The engine might be on rubber mounts but they are placed so the engine rotates in place, it doesn't rock back and forth, that's why the alignment jig is so important.


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I assumed the ball end on the pump side of the shaft was for ease of installation of the pump. You have to think if you were relying on a steel on steel spline to create a flex joint it wouldn't last any time at all.

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